Completed
Push — master ( 02710e...15b052 )
by Freek
06:30
created

Delimited::passes()   C

Complexity

Conditions 11
Paths 118

Size

Total Lines 58

Duplication

Lines 0
Ratio 0 %

Code Coverage

Tests 31
CRAP Score 11

Importance

Changes 0
Metric Value
dl 0
loc 58
ccs 31
cts 31
cp 1
rs 6.6496
c 0
b 0
f 0
cc 11
nc 118
nop 2
crap 11

How to fix   Long Method    Complexity   

Long Method

Small methods make your code easier to understand, in particular if combined with a good name. Besides, if your method is small, finding a good name is usually much easier.

For example, if you find yourself adding comments to a method's body, this is usually a good sign to extract the commented part to a new method, and use the comment as a starting point when coming up with a good name for this new method.

Commonly applied refactorings include:

1
<?php
2
3
namespace Spatie\ValidationRules\Rules;
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5
use Illuminate\Support\Str;
6
use Illuminate\Contracts\Validation\Rule;
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use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Validator;
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class Delimited implements Rule
10
{
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    /** @var string|array|\Illuminate\Contracts\Validation\Rule */
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    protected $rule;
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    protected $minimum = null;
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    protected $maximum = null;
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    protected $allowDuplicates = false;
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    protected $message = '';
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    protected $separatedBy = ',';
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    /** @var bool */
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    protected $trimItems = true;
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    /** @var string */
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    protected $validationMessageWord = 'item';
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30 60
    public function __construct($rule)
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    {
32 60
        $this->rule = $rule;
33 60
    }
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35 6
    public function min(int $minimum)
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    {
37 6
        $this->minimum = $minimum;
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39 6
        return $this;
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    }
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42 6
    public function max(int $maximum)
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    {
44 6
        $this->maximum = $maximum;
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46 6
        return $this;
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    }
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49 6
    public function allowDuplicates(bool $allowed = true)
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    {
51 6
        $this->allowDuplicates = $allowed;
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53 6
        return $this;
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    }
55
56 6
    public function separatedBy(string $separator)
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    {
58 6
        $this->separatedBy = $separator;
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60 6
        return $this;
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    }
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63 6
    public function doNotTrimItems()
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    {
65 6
        $this->trimItems = false;
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67 6
        return true;
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    }
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    public function validationMessageWord(string $word)
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    {
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        $this->validationMessageWord = $word;
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        return $this;
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    }
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77 60
    public function passes($attribute, $value)
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    {
79 60
        if ($this->trimItems) {
80 54
            $value = trim($value);
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        }
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83 60
        $items = collect(explode($this->separatedBy, $value))->filter();
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85 60
        if (! is_null($this->minimum)) {
86 6
            if ($items->count() < $this->minimum) {
87 6
                $this->message = __('validation.delimited.min', [
0 ignored issues
show
Documentation Bug introduced by freek
It seems like __('validation.delimited...ord, $items->count()))) can also be of type array. However, the property $message is declared as type string. Maybe add an additional type check?

Our type inference engine has found a suspicous assignment of a value to a property. This check raises an issue when a value that can be of a mixed type is assigned to a property that is type hinted more strictly.

For example, imagine you have a variable $accountId that can either hold an Id object or false (if there is no account id yet). Your code now assigns that value to the id property of an instance of the Account class. This class holds a proper account, so the id value must no longer be false.

Either this assignment is in error or a type check should be added for that assignment.

class Id
{
    public $id;

    public function __construct($id)
    {
        $this->id = $id;
    }

}

class Account
{
    /** @var  Id $id */
    public $id;
}

$account_id = false;

if (starsAreRight()) {
    $account_id = new Id(42);
}

$account = new Account();
if ($account instanceof Id)
{
    $account->id = $account_id;
}
Loading history...
88 6
                    'minimum' => $this->minimum,
89 6
                    'actual' => $items->count(),
90 6
                    'item' => Str::plural($this->validationMessageWord, $items->count()),
91
                ]);
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93 6
                return false;
94
            }
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        }
96
97 60
        if (! is_null($this->maximum)) {
98 6
            if ($items->count() > $this->maximum) {
99 6
                $this->message = __('validation.delimited.max', [
0 ignored issues
show
Documentation Bug introduced by freek
It seems like __('validation.delimited...ord, $items->count()))) can also be of type array. However, the property $message is declared as type string. Maybe add an additional type check?

Our type inference engine has found a suspicous assignment of a value to a property. This check raises an issue when a value that can be of a mixed type is assigned to a property that is type hinted more strictly.

For example, imagine you have a variable $accountId that can either hold an Id object or false (if there is no account id yet). Your code now assigns that value to the id property of an instance of the Account class. This class holds a proper account, so the id value must no longer be false.

Either this assignment is in error or a type check should be added for that assignment.

class Id
{
    public $id;

    public function __construct($id)
    {
        $this->id = $id;
    }

}

class Account
{
    /** @var  Id $id */
    public $id;
}

$account_id = false;

if (starsAreRight()) {
    $account_id = new Id(42);
}

$account = new Account();
if ($account instanceof Id)
{
    $account->id = $account_id;
}
Loading history...
100 6
                    'maximum' => $this->maximum,
101 6
                    'actual' => $items->count(),
102 6
                    'item' => Str::plural($this->validationMessageWord, $items->count()),
103
                ]);
104
105 6
                return false;
106
            }
107
        }
108
109 60
        if ($this->trimItems) {
110
            $items = $items->map(function (string $item) {
111 54
                return trim($item);
112 54
            });
113
        }
114
115 60
        foreach ($items as $item) {
116 60
            [$isValid, $validationMessage] = $this->validate($attribute, $item);
0 ignored issues
show
Bug introduced by freek
The variable $isValid does not exist. Did you forget to declare it?

This check marks access to variables or properties that have not been declared yet. While PHP has no explicit notion of declaring a variable, accessing it before a value is assigned to it is most likely a bug.

Loading history...
Bug introduced by freek
The variable $validationMessage does not exist. Did you forget to declare it?

This check marks access to variables or properties that have not been declared yet. While PHP has no explicit notion of declaring a variable, accessing it before a value is assigned to it is most likely a bug.

Loading history...
117
118 60
            if (! $isValid) {
119 36
                $this->message = $validationMessage;
120
121 36
                return false;
122
            }
123
        }
124
125 60
        if (! $this->allowDuplicates) {
126 54
            if ($items->unique()->count() !== $items->count()) {
127 6
                $this->message = __('validation.delimited.unique');
0 ignored issues
show
Documentation Bug introduced by freek
It seems like __('validation.delimited.unique') can also be of type array. However, the property $message is declared as type string. Maybe add an additional type check?

Our type inference engine has found a suspicous assignment of a value to a property. This check raises an issue when a value that can be of a mixed type is assigned to a property that is type hinted more strictly.

For example, imagine you have a variable $accountId that can either hold an Id object or false (if there is no account id yet). Your code now assigns that value to the id property of an instance of the Account class. This class holds a proper account, so the id value must no longer be false.

Either this assignment is in error or a type check should be added for that assignment.

class Id
{
    public $id;

    public function __construct($id)
    {
        $this->id = $id;
    }

}

class Account
{
    /** @var  Id $id */
    public $id;
}

$account_id = false;

if (starsAreRight()) {
    $account_id = new Id(42);
}

$account = new Account();
if ($account instanceof Id)
{
    $account->id = $account_id;
}
Loading history...
128
129 6
                return false;
130
            }
131
        }
132
133 54
        return true;
134
    }
135
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    public function message()
137
    {
138
        return $this->message;
139
    }
140
141 60
    protected function validate(string $attribute, string $item): array
142
    {
143 60
        $attribute = Str::after($attribute, '.');
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145 60
        $validator = Validator::make([$attribute => $item], [$attribute => $this->rule]);
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        return [
148 60
            $validator->passes(),
149 60
            $validator->getMessageBag()->first($attribute),
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        ];
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    }
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}
153